Upcoming Photography event for Laois

We are pleased to invite members of the public to come along explore the history of photography with renowned photographer Veronica Nicholson during Heritage Week 2019. Veronica is a photographic artist and educator, with a Masters’ degree in Digital Art who lives in the Midlands.

Jackie Gorman, CEO of Midlands Science said,

‘Join us for Heritage Week with a science twist in on August 21st in Laois. Photography is both an art and a science and can provide us with an insight into past times. It continues to this day to be a great hobby for people, with amazing technological advances in photography. Veronica Nicholson will explore how photography began and how it has developed over time, both as a process and as a past-time. We are encouraging those attending to bring along old photographs and cameras on the day so that together, we can explore the history of photography and how it relates to our everyday lives.’

This unique event entitled, ‘Light Tales, Photography History’ will take place from 4-5pm in the Portlaoise Library, Lyster Square, Portlaoise on August 21st.

Admission is free and the event in suitable for children under 12 and people of all ages. For further information and booking please contact Jackie Gorman on 0579323902 or at jgorman@midlandsscience.ie

FREE HERITAGE WEEK PHOTOGRAPHY EVENT WITH MIDLANDS SCIENCE

Midlands Science is pleased to invite members of the public to come along to explore the history of photography with renowned photographer Veronica Nicholson during Heritage Week 2019. Veronica is a photographic artist and educator, with a Masters’ degree in Digital Art, and she lives here in the Midlands.
Jackie Gorman, CEO of Midlands Science, said,

‘Join us for national Heritage Week with a science twist on August 20th in Athlone. Photography has been with us since 1839, even before the famine, and so photographs provide a magical portal into past times. It continues to this day to be a great hobby for people, and estimates suggest that more than 1 trillion photos were taken in 2018 alone. Veronica will explain what exactly happened in 1839 and how photography has developed over time, both as a process and as a pastime. Most importantly, we are encouraging those attending to bring along old photographs and cameras on the day so that together we can explore the stories behind the images and the history of photography and how it relates to our everyday lives.’
There is no doubt that photographs offer an invaluable representation of Ireland’s history and heritage and in the current world of digital photography many people are not as inclined to print their images, often losing precious memories that may never see the light of day.

Veronica commented,
‘I am delighted to host this special photographic event and to work with Midlands Science during Heritage Week 2019 in Athlone. Old photographs and historical images can offer a fascinating and comprehensive insight into Irish life from decades gone by and can showcase how much change has taken place before modern society and a new Ireland emerged. I am really looking forward to delving into this, and encourage people to bring along any old cameras they may have as well as their cherished family portraits that may have been preserved for generations, local street scenes or Irish landscapes or even unplanned shots of people just living life, as they provide a really special glimpse into family history and to the past.’

This unique event entitled, ‘Light Tales, Photography History’ will take place from 5pm – 6pm on August 20th in the Aidan Heavey Library in Athlone. Admission is free and the event in suitable for people of all ages. For further information and booking please contact Jackie Gorman on 0579323902 or at jgorman@midlandsscience.ie

Focus on Heritage

The Midlands Science Festival will be taking place across the region for people of all ages from November 12th – 19th and promises a packed programme with over 130 innovative and fun hands-on events. A key theme for this year is that of heritage and Midlands Science has teamed up with Creative Ireland to provide one Offaly school with a project which celebrates the work of a local nineteenth century pioneering scientist, microscopist and naturalist Mary Ward, who was working at a time when it was very difficult for women to be taken seriously in any field other than the domestic.

Amanda Pedlow, Heritage Officer of Offaly County Council commented,
It is wonderful to see this performance focusing on Mary Ward in Banagher for Science Week 2017. Creative Ireland has provided this opportunity for us to transform the ways in which our cultural heritage is perceived and understood. As heritage is a key theme this year, it is an even better fit and I have no doubt that students will really benefit from being involved with this performance curated by artists Tina Claffey and Caroline Conway which enables them to see just how diverse and exciting science can be.’

This is the fifth year that a dedicated programme of free Science Week events is being rolled out in the counties of Laois, Offaly, Westmeath and Longford. It will bring together a large number of interested participants including science communicators, performers and researchers, science and technology speakers, science and TY students, mini scientists and the general public from all over the Midlands and beyond.

Caroline Conway who will deliver this particular workshop said,
‘This a very exciting project and we are delighted to be bringing it to an Offaly school for this year’s Midlands Science Festival. This particular event is quite different to traditional ones as we are using a variety of art forms to promote science. The project consists of a projection of macro-photography and Zoetrope animation. Zoetrope animation was invented in the 1850’s at the same time as Mary Ward was examining the minutiae of nature with the microscope, and we are combining old and new technologies to bring excitement to this subject. There is also drama and music involved so we hope that the students will enjoy it, particular given the Midlands connection.’